Last week, Andrew linked to some stories detailing the latest nanny state plans coming out of the office of the New York Mayor, and possible forthcoming presidential candidate, Mike Bloomberg.  Well, yesterday, those opposing the ridiculous "permits to film or photograph" scheme concocted by the Mayor's Office had a little victory, if only a temporary one:

The consultation period ended yesterday, but activists at the New York Civil Liberties Union, which backed the protest have already claimed a victory.

The Mayor’s Office of Film, Theatre and Broadcasting has agreed to redraft the rules in light of their concerns – and the new proposals will be open to comments for another 30 days.

In a statement, the office said: ‘We have endeavoured to meet the challenge of identifying a threshold level of activity which necessitates a film permit. The goal is to maintain a safe environment for the public, while balancing the needs of filmmakers whose work may have a significant impact on pedestrian or vehicular use of public space.’

Don't worry, though, Bloomberg has been setting his sights on other matters of concern besides the intersection between photography and public safety on the New York streets-- yesterday he weighed into the debate over bottled versus tap water.

Bloomberg seems to be showing an increasing tendency to meddle in just about everything, on "common good" grounds, and it's something that I have to say seriously, seriously annoys me.  Especially if we are headed towards a Bloomberg presidential candidacy (which, incidentally, Ed Koch thinks we are-- side note to Ed on the title of his piece in tomorrow's WaPo, though: you may like Mike, but I highly doubt I will, no matter what you say).  Sam Nunn seems to be gunning for Bloomberg, or some independent in any event (maybe even himself) to run, too.

Still, my assessment of Bloomberg's prospects, whether he runs or not, is pretty well summed up by this image, which comes courtesy of LolPresidents:

www.lizmair.com

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