Here's a particularly knee-jerk sentiment, even from Michelle Malkin. She's responding to the notion of a poetry anthology by Gitmo inmates. Her response:

How about a poetry anthology from the families of the victims of many of those Gitmo jihadists?

The trouble is, dear Michelle, we do not know how many of these detainees had any victims at all; many have been declared innocent of anything by even the Bush administration, and set free; less than 20 percent were originally detained by U.S. forces; the evidence convicting scores of others is either extremely weak, non-existent, or dependent on the testimony of the tortured. Yes, some are the worst of the worst. But, alas, we do not know exactly which. And the sheer assumption of guilt and indefinite detention are alien to every concept underpinning Western notions of justice and legal warfare. Aren't those what we're fighting for? Then there's this piece of bile from Jules Crittenden. He penned his own poem for the Gitmo detainees, irrespective of the circumstances of their capture and imprisonment:

Rose are Red
Violets are Blue
In the Hated Crusader Gulag at Guantanamo
It must suck to be you

It takes a particularly depraved soul to observe captives sentenced to life imprisonment in solitary confinement without trial or hope - whatever their past - and laugh in their faces.

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