A Slipping Sensation

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From the NYT Magazine's fascinating story on evolutionary psychology and religion, "Darwin's God":

In John Updike's celebrated early short story "Pigeon Feathers," 14-year-old David spends a lot of time thinking about death. He suspects that adults are lying when they say his spirit will live on after he dies. He keeps catching them in inconsistencies when he asks where exactly his soul will spend eternity. "Don't you see," he cries to his mother, "if when we die there’s nothing, all your sun and fields and what not are all, ah, horror? It’s just an ocean of horror."

The story ends with David's tiny revelation and his boundless relief. The boy gets a gun for his 15th birthday, which he uses to shoot down some pigeons that have been nesting in his grandmother’s barn. Before he buries them, he studies the dead birds’ feathers. He is amazed by their swirls of color, "designs executed, it seemed, in a controlled rapture." And suddenly the fears that have plagued him are lifted, and with a "slipping sensation along his nerves that seemed to give the air hands, he was robed in this certainty: that the God who had lavished such craft upon these worthless birds would not destroy His whole Creation by refusing to let David live forever."

I'll post my response to Sam Harris very soon. Apologies. But Dinesh got in the way.

(Photo: An Afghan woman from the Uzbek ethnic group feeds pigeons in front of the shrine of Hazrat-i-Ali in Mazar-i-Sharif, 28 February 2007. SHAH Marai/AFP/Getty.)