"One might reasonably argue that a very good way to protect marriage is to remain faithful to one's spouse, but in politics that sort of behavior won't raise money for the interest groups or votes for the Republicans. In this case, "family values" wasn't about Sherwood's personal example, but his record of keeping homosexuals from marrying. Wouldn't it do more for the family to strengthen heterosexual marriage before telling others how to live their lives? Why have we seen so many politicians (and some clergy) who talk about "family values" turn out to be the worst practitioners of them?

With a change in focus, more people might want to hear why conservative Christians are faithful and, having heard, perhaps embrace that faithfulness. The culture might then reflect real "family values" from the bottom up, possibly even touching politicians in Washington," - Cal Thomas, getting it right.

Thomas has long warned, by the way, of politicizing faith and morals. This isn't a new position of his. Check out his book of a while back. But it's great to see some conservative voices restating a conservative case: Christianity is best expressed by personal example, not political agendas. And a Christianity that becomes indistinguishable from partisan politics has lost its soul.

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