A reader writes:

I just want you to know that there's at least one active Mormon "out there" who appreciates and supports what you are doing.  I blogged about it here and I discussed it on a local Utah radio show, which you can listen to here.

Ultimately the more candid, open, and honest discussion there is about Mormonism--and frankly, the more awareness that can be broadly generated about some of the more controversial and damaging aspects of our history and doctrine--the greater the likelihood that the top leadership will make positive progress in improving on the weaker parts of our faith and culture (renouncing the loopiness, etc.).  Ultimately, sunshine is the best antiseptic, as they say.

He's not alone, it seems:

I'm a long-time LDS reader of your website.  Am still enjoying it.

Yes, your publishing the garment photos was a tad offensive to most of us. But you're right that our taboos need not be your own. And truth be told, we Mormons are really hypersensitive about criticism (or even discussion) of our faith in the media. (Bad experiences in the 19th Century, misrepresentations of our doctrines in the 20th, etc.). The Romney candidacy, as well as public discussions of Mormonism on blogs such as yours, can only do a service to the Mormons in the long run.  So many in our community don't want to discuss various aspects of Mormonism even amongst themselves, much less with outsiders.  But the more exposure we get, and the more that various Mormon "oddities" are scrutinized in the press, the more we'll have to think about various doctrinal and historical issues, as well as talk about them.

As far as this Mormon is concerned, that's a very good thing. At least it will make my otherwise stale Church meetings a bit more interesting. For that, you have my eternal gratitude.

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