Another classic:

"In great contests, each party claims to act in accordance with the will of God. Both may be, and one must be wrong. God cannot be for and against the same thing at the same time," - Abraham Lincoln, memorandum dated September 30, 1862.

My italics. But they are a remarkable three words. One of the principles ultimately at stake in the relevant contest was slavery - something which Lincoln indisputably opposed. And yet skepticism restrained him even then from invoking God's sanction for his actions. Can you imagine what today's absolutist conservatives would now say of him? And the moral equivalence they would accuse him of?

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