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A final confirmation that Haggard was still lying yesterday. But what's interesting to me is that having adulterous gay sex is apparently, in Haggard's mind, a worse sin than buying crystal meth. He copped to the meth before the sex. A reader commented yesterday:

It's telling that Rev. Haggard first admission is to purchasing meth. America can tolerate drug stories. We've heard them before. We like them even. The popularity of James Frey's memoir, err, novel, speaks to our affinity for these tales of dissolution and rehabilitation. After all, a user can be redeemed. Not so with a homosexual. What I believe is most horrifying to many Christianists about homosexuality is that it can't be fixed, or worse, that its practitioners do not even desire to be fixed. Gays are sinners who don't want redemption.

Recall that Rep. Foley used a similar tactic in the unspooling of his confessions. As I remember it, Foley checked into a substance abuse program just days after the allegations of page abuse surfaced. That strategy: turn pedophilia into a story about alcoholism and Foley's own childhood abuse. We don't know how the Haggard story will eventually unfold, but I bet that his handlers will hide the sex behind the smoke of the meth pipe as much as they can.

Wrong, it turns out. The drugs-worse-than sex may be a story that works in the mainstream; but among some Christianists, drug abuse is nowhere near as bad as being gay.

(Photo: Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty.)

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