Oldglory_1

A reader writes:

I am a recent and avid reader of your blog who has never written to any political figure before. So why you and why now? I have always considered myself a staunch liberal (i think that affirmative action has a place in society.) Yet, recently I have realized that many of my generation (I am 25) who loved the "liberal" Clinton 90's believe in low taxes, balanced budgets, and free trade. Combined with a belief in gay rights my "liberalism" sounds not unlike your "conservatism." The kicker is that my foreign policy guru is Fareed Zakaria, former-Reagantite and a longtime friend of yours.

I think that many of my generation are like me; we long for a moderate, fiscally responsible domestic policy while advocating and international and realist foreign policy that will keep us the greatest nation in the world. (Yes, for us, Clinton was most of that.)  Whether you agree with that or not I certainly agree with another of your readers that you may have hit upon a new ideology that defies current definition.

I liked Clintonism (although I don't like affirmative action). But Clintonism was made possible in part by Gingrich. Clinton before 1994 was not as helpful (apart from the EITC and budget reform). But the reader is right. What I hope to do on the blog in the next few months is chart a new political direction that focuses on sensible small-c conservative reform: of gerrymandering, pork, entitlement excess, corporate welfare, immigration chaos, poor intelligence, and a realist attempt to get Iraq right. Let's leave the labels behind. There is a lot the vital center can agree on.

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