A true conservative wrote:

"To prove that these sorts of policed societies are a violation offered to nature, and a Burke_7 constraint upon the human mind, it needs only to look upon the sanguinary measures, and instruments of violence which are every where used to support them.

Let us take a review of the dungeons, whips, chains, racks, gibbets, with which every society is abundantly stored, by which hundreds of victims are annually offered up to support a a dozen or two in pride and madness, and millions in an abject servitude and dependence.  There was a time, when I looked with reverential awe on these mysteries of policy; but age, experience, and philosophy, have rent the veil; and I view this sanctum sanctorum, at least, without any enthusiastic admiration.  I acknowledge indeed, the necessity of such a proceeding in such institutions; but I must have a very mean opinion of institutions where such proceedings are necessary."

It's from "A Vindication Of Natural Society Or A View Of The Miseries And Evils Arising To Mankind From Every Species Of Artificial Society" published in 1756.

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