Yes, in some respects, it is. Money quote:

"What this bill would do is take our civilization back 900 years," to before the adoption of the writ of habeas corpus in medieval England, Senator Specter said.

Mr. Leahy said the bill as written would allow the executive branch to hold any lawful immigrant in the United States indefinitely without charge. "We are about to put the darkest blot on the conscience of the nation," he said, charging that the push for quick passage was purely for political gain. "There is no new national security crisis," he said. "There’s only a Republican political crisis."

This is what conservatism has now become. Because of McCain's capitulation and the Democrats' cowardice, this bill will now pass. The use of torture as a campaign weapon will be brutal, and deployed first and foremost by this president:

Underscoring the political stakes involved, White House spokesman Tony Snow said today that President Bush will emphasize Democratic opposition to the bill in campaign appearances.

"He'll be citing some of the comments that members of the Democratic leadership have made in recent days about what they think is necessary for winning the war on terror," Mr. Snow told reporters en route to a fundraiser in Alabama, according to a transcript provided by the White House.

The only response is for the public to send a message this fall. In congressional races, your decision should always take into account the quality of the individual candidates. But this November, the stakes are higher. If this Republican party maintains control of all branches of government, the danger to individual liberty is extremely grave. Put aside all your concerns about the Democratic leadership. What matters now is that this juggernaut against individual liberty and constitutional rights be stopped. The court has failed to stop it; the legislature has failed to stop it; only the voters can stop it now. If they don't, they will at least have been warned.

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