Here's a gritty bio of a successful local Republican politician:

The third time was the charm for Koering. In 1996 and in 2000, Koering, a small business owner and farmer, ran against veteran DFL Senator Don Samuelson of Brainerd. Koering lost both times, thought it wasn't from lack of work. The first time, he knocked on 16,000 doors in the district, fitting that campaign work in between twice a day milking of his 60 cow dairy herd. In 2000, he repeated the effort, again fitting it into twice a day milkings. Still determined, Koering ran again, but he had more time in 2002. He had sold the herd after the second campaign. Koering's defeat of Samuelson, who was then president of the Senate, was one of the 2002 legislative election's biggest surprises.

Koering views his job to be "giving people a hand up, not a hand out". This biennium, he will focus on health care, education and some bonding projects for his district. Koering has again introduced legislation to make English the official language of Minnesota, and he continues to advocate for gun rights and pro-life legislation.

He describes himself not as ultra conservative or ultra liberal but rather as a realist, and says he has not made up his mind on all issues- for example, the statewide smoking ban. Koering says such a ban walks a "fine line" between health, personal rights, and property rights.

Oh, and he's openly gay, and just won his primary. See how tolerance can actually help the GOP?

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