A reader dissents:

You write: "Do we want to revisit their and our own traumas as entertainment?" Clearly, no. But I suspect this movie is not about entertainment. It's about education. I suppose some could say that Schindler's List is entertainment, but it's not.  Schindler's List is a story of heroism and that one man can make a difference in the lives of thousands of others. That is a story that needs to be told again and again, not because it is entertaining, but because it is important that people know that true heroes are still out there.  That heroic acts are still possible.

I suspect United 93 is that kind of story.

I doubt I will see the movie.  But I would venture that, if done correctly, it could be one of the most important films in years. It could stand as a testament to heroism and the futility of terrorism so long as heroes are among us.

Well, I hope so. For my part, I'll be attending the premiere of the documentary, "Saint of 9/11," about that remarkable American and Catholic, Mychal Judge, the fire-fighter's chaplain who died serving his flock. I saw a rough cut a while back, and if it's even better than it was, it's an astonishingly powerful movie. Ian McKellan narrates it. But Judge is the focus - or, rather, the great and humble faith that made this man a son of God.

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