Russ Feingold is the fourth U.S. Senator to support marriage equality for gay citizens. I'll take him at his word that he's responding to a draconian ban on legal gay relationships in Wisconsin. But it will also surely help him in the Democratic primaries, especially with gay money. Clinton was the first candidate to seek such money openly, well over a decade ago. Now, you have the prospect of a national politician endorsing marriage as a way to build a campaign. That's a shift forward. Of course, it will be described, and already has been, as a "fringe left" move. This sentiment is now "fringe-left":

"I will be voting against the harsh amendment that's been proposed in Wisconsin, and I thought it was an appropriate occasion to indicate my feeling that if two people care enough about each other to get married, that it probably is a positive thing for society."

If someone were saying that about straight people, they'd be regarded as a conservative Republican. When they say it about gay people, they're "fringe left." Go figure. But congrats, Senator. You've done the right thing. One day, it will seem obvious. And you'll seem on the leading edge of humane reform.

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