Wait, there's more:

"I grew up in a very liberal, pc area. I remember that when I was five, I corrected my father and told him to call the Indian Ocean the Native American Ocean. I’m actually happy that I had the PC upbringing that I had, as it made me more able to enjoy this post-PC era.

Post-PC deserves at least two-cheers, but at least one other post-PC pop culture item deserves mention, the Family Guy. For a majority of twenty-somethings this is the post-PC show.

First, the Family Guy has taken offensiveness to a whole new level, and recognized that if you offend everyone, you offend nobody. Any show that makes domestic violence humorous by realizing we are in on the joke is one that deserves acclaim. It’s a show where the lead character can: wish his son were Jewish so he was smarter; find out he is black and then spend reparations money on turning his living room into Pee Wee’s play house; take his son to an Irish museum where there is a mechanical woman that has a baby constantly; and have a baby that wishes he were homosexual when he was older so that he wouldn’t have to deal with women like his mother.

It even mocks Slobodan Milosevich and Saddam Hussein (the scene where Hussein is talking about an episode of Seinfeld at Peter’s house was amazing. I’m waiting for an Ahmadinejad joke).   

Still, the ultimate acknowledgement of post-PC came within the show, so in an attempt to win a poseur award I’ll call it “meta-post-PC”.  It was when Brian the talking dog barked at a black character on the show, apologized noting that his father was from a different era, and then said, “I’m sorry, really, I vote Democrat.”  As a Democrat, I know it’s exactly how many of us feel, but shouldn’t.

The post-PC thing is much more helpful than the PC era of the 90’s, but could we have been as comfortable with the jokes that exist post-PC without having been through the PC era?"

Maybe political correctness was indeed a necessary phase in our churning popular culture. I'm just glad it's over.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.