Go look at the cartoons. They are not against Islam, although they understandably bristle at the intolerance of some contemporary Muslims in Europe. They are against what has been done in the name of Islam. They are about, in the words of the editor who published them, the way in which Islamist thugs have intimidated free speech in Europe:

"These were not directed against Muslims, but against people in cultural life in Europe who are submitting themselves to self-censorship when dealing with Islam. I wanted these cartoonists to appear under their own names. That was the point of the whole journalistic exercise."

Get it now, Bill? These cartoons help expose the brutalization of women, the use of violence in defense of faith, the idiocy of suicide bombers allegedly going to heaven, and so on. If we cannot speak of these things without giving offense, then we have lost our ability to discuss freely the most significant cultural shift of our time: the rise and rise of religious fundamentalism. While I'm still steaming, let me ask another question: How can Clinton glibly speak of historical anti-Semitism in Europe without noting that the most unrestrained anti-Semitism is now parlayed by the Islamic religious right? Where does he get off lecturing free people about their right of free expression, while remaining silent about the pathological anti-Semitism now manifested in Islamo-fascism and its adherents across the globe? Here's one option: buy Danish.

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