A new phase in the fundamentalist war on science may be about to begin. I can see the point about not forcing doctors or pharmacists to violate their consciences. It's a good one. But simply prescribing
pills does not seem to me to be moral complicity with what someone might do with them. And the principle could be very far-reaching. Could Opus Dei members refuse to prescribe contraceptive pills? Could scientologists refuse to prescribe anti-depression medications? Could a fundamentalist refuse Viagra to a gay man or a single woman? And so on. There was a time when religious faith was not so extreme that it could not allow for a separate sphere for professional life - for dealing with people outside a particular tradition or faith. We once allowed for strong religious faith but also for a neutral but respectful public square. What fundamentalism does is demand the complete submission of all parts of life - professional, civic, political - to the demands of dogma. This is just the latest repercussion. It won't be the last.

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