I guess I had this coming:

"I often find your analysis nuanced and unique, so it proves frustrating when you callously dismiss Kos as 'the man who's doing so much to ensure that the Republicans stay in power for ever'.

I wonder how much of his writings you actually read, in simply lumping him in with the fringe elements who participate in the flourishing online community he has created.  Would it surprise you to hear that Kos is consistently beating the refrain of sanity when it comes to the need for an acceptance of Democrats in a Conservative mold in areas such as Montana, Colorado, Arkansas, etc... much to the chagrin of his readership at times.  That he rails in favour of grassroots participation over the failed cynicism of the professional advisor cliques who have done much to destroy the Democratic party.  That he calls attention every Tuesday to another of the many heroes of the Iraqi war who have returned home and are running for Congress under the Democratic ticket.

He has done as much to demonstrate and unleash the potential of the Internet in politics as anyone. Yet you still find it so easy to dismiss him as just another hack.  In doing so, you sell him and his accomplishments short, and the one-line attacks such as today's serve to cheapen the debate. Step back from the personal shots and confront him on specific tactics and issues. You can do better."

Ouch. Just read the profile or visit his site. And make your own mind up.

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