Carl Bernstein's Next Book Subject: How He Got His Start

Turns out Carl Bernstein had a career before the Watergate scoop. In an effort to prove as much, his next book will be a memoir about his "early work," so to speak—the five years he spent as an  apprentice at The Washington Star, which shuttered in 1981.

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Turns out Carl Bernstein had a career before the Watergate scoop. In an effort to prove as much, his next book will be a memoir about his "early work," so to speak: the five years he spent as an  apprentice at The Washington Star, which shuttered in 1981.

Flatteringly, the book is also titled The Washington Star. Get it?

Of course, Bernstein has accomplished plenty since his days bringing down an American presidency—including books about about Pope John Paul II and Hillary Clinton—but his life before the spotlight hasn't been widely covered. The Washington Star is where he first developed his reporting chops, beginning in 1960 as a 16-year-old copyboy and then dropping out of school to rise up the ranks of the publication. (He never ended up graduating from college.) Via USA Today, he has fine memories of the paper, the existence of which hardly anyone under 40 will remember:

"My understanding of journalism, and the world I've covered and written about, and the life I've led, crystallized in those five incomparable years at a uniquely great newspaper," Bernstein, 69, said in a statement from his publisher, Henry Holt.

You can't blame Bernstein for being in a nostalgic mood lately: his beloved Washington Post was just sold to Jeff Bezos in August, prompting many a recollection about the golden age of newspapers and just how far the Post has fallen to its $250 million price tag. And if we're going to romanticize a bygone media era, we may as well hear it from one of the chief figures of the age when newspapers ruled supreme.

This article is from the archive of our partner The Wire.