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Urban Outfitters plan to open up shop in Williamsburg complete with a fully stocked bar is not off to the greatest start. If a city councilman gets his way, every hipster's favorite clothing store will be as dry as, well, a normal clothing store when they finally open in Brooklyn.

It seems this planned Urban Outfitters where someone could potentially buy clothes and top the purchase off with a drink will face some stiff competition before it opens. One city councilman is already fighting the plans to serve liquor and leggings in the same location. "I can't think of a circumstance for which it would be appropriate for Urban Outfitters to have a liquor license," Greenpoint city councilman Stephen Levin told the New York Daily News, before positing probably the greatest question ever asked by a civic official: "We must ask ourselves, 'Do we really want people drunk when they are buying their skinny jeans and ironic t-shirts?'" 

As it stands, people looking to shop at Urban Outfitters for whatever hipster uniform they're hawking this month have to trudge all the way to Manhattan. But that changed when, in March, Crain's reported the store's plans to open  -- where else -- on North Sixth Street in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. The jokes about an Urban Outfitters in Williamsburg practically wrote themselves. Then, in March, Grub Street New York noticed the store was planning to apply for a liquor license. The Urban Outfitters in Williamsburg was to have a bar. Because of course, is why. Sure enough, Urban Outfitters was among the astonishing 106 liquor license applications received by the Williamsburg and Greenpoint Community Board 1 in September. (Most are renewals, but there are 37 new applications including Urban Outfitters.)

Now we have to wait and see how this campaign plays out. There's a long bureaucratic process that will have to resolve itself before Urban Outfitters learns whether or not they can sling whiskey beside their hot pants. The next hurdle is a meeting with the board's liquor authority review committee on October 3. 

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