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Now that The New York TimesĀ pay wall is live, you only get 20 free clicks a month. For those worried about hitting their limit, we're taking a look through the paper each morning to find the stories that can make your clicks count.

The home page leads, naturally, with the news that Libyan fighters have declared victory in Sirte, Col. Muammar Qaddafi's hometown and the last stronghold of loyalist fighters, and Qaddafi himself has been killed. Also high on the page, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton issued a stern warning to Pakistan to stop harboring violent militants fighting U.S. troops in Afghanistan. For us, the top read was the confounding and sad mystery over a teenager's death in a football game, and the quest by his parents and school to reconstruct what happened.

World: If you missed the news as it was happening on Wednesday, check out the report (with amazing pictures) on British police evicting travelers from the long-held Dale Farm encampment in Essex County. And the lead story, on how the family of freed Israeli soldier Gilad Shalit campaigned for his release, gives some good backstory to the prisoner swap that led to his freedom.

U.S.: Check out the latest in The Times series on natural gas exploration, covering the conflicts that can arise between banks, gas companies, and the homeowners who sign leases to allow drilling. And while the story on the escaped animals in Ohio is widely available elsewhere, The Times' coverage is quite colorful, with lots of detail, and well worth the click.

Business / Technology: You can skip the lead story on the FDA identifying the source of those listeria-tainted cantaloupes (it was an unsanitary packing plant in Colorado, as the Washington Post will tell you). Rather, check out the report on Citigroup settling an SEC fraud complaint for $285 million. And in Technology, check out the feature borrowed from Style on Randi Zuckerberg's life post-Facebook, which involves at least a little tequila and karaoke in addition to starting her own business.

Sports: The World Series is underway, so catch the game story on the Cardinals' win over the Rangers. And for a little more intrigue, though it's depressing, check out the report on high school officials trying to piece together a football game after which a player died.

Opinion: In the lead op-ed, urban planning professorĀ Jerold S. Kayden makes the case that New York City's privately owned public spaces (like Zuccotti Park), require rescuing by some kind of steward after being "orphaned" by their owners.

Arts: The lead story is well worth the click, about Britain making it much harder for visiting artists and performers to get visas. And the review of Batman: Akham City makes for a fun read about an even more fun-sounding game.

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