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Everyone's getting into the Earth Day spirit. So why not mega-corporations too? Publicists love the marketing opportunities and the brands value the earth-saving possibilities of a free, reusuable tote bag nearly as much as the next guy.

So, as the year's most environmentally conscious day commences, here's a list of the latest campaigns designed to get you to save the Earth by visiting your local big box retailer:

  • Target: It's touting a "refresh your nest" sweepstakes which allows you to enter a $50,000 home-makeover contest. So, if you win you can just throw out all your old junk, right? It's unclear what, if anything, this has to do with being environmentally friendly other than placing the contest next to a green Target logo. But look, they're doing their part by giving out free reusable bags.
  • Disney: "Get your kids in the Earth Day spirit with a trip to the Disney Store," reads an ABC News article that sounds way too much like a press release for its parent company. A look into the Disney Store website reveals a promotion for a free green Mickey Mouse tote bag if you bring five plastic bags to a store location. And, Disney, presumably won't mind if you browse around a little while your there.
  • Patagonia: The environmentally-conscious (but pricey--it's been dubbed "patagucci") outfitter is launching a mobile ad campaign to drive users to Apple's iTunes and App Store. The campaign's called "buy a song, benefit the environment."
  • Starbucks: Pretty simple. In celebration of Earth Day, if you bring a travel mug to a location, you'll get a free cup of coffee. "You're helping to reduce our environmental impact!" the website enthuses.
  • Best Buy: The chain has offered to "take care of your unwanted electronics" by properly recycling any sort of electronics if you bring it to a store. "Most things are recycled absolutely free, with a few restrictions," they note. Overshadowed, Radioshack is offering something similar.
  • eBay: The site's "green team" wants you to share your green shopping list. If you do, you could win $5,000 to buy stuff.

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