The case that Democrats are winning the PR battle in Wisconsin gets a boost from a new USA Today/Gallup poll showing that nationwide, a large majority of voters would oppose a law like the one that Governor Walker is pushing in Wisconsin.  Conservatives citing polls like the recent Clarus Poll showing that less than a third of Americans think public sector workers should be unionized should consider that this may not necessarily translate into support for Walker trying to weaken those unions.  

Does the American public contradict itself?  Very well, then, it contradicts itself--it is large, it contains multitudes.   After all, check out the other key findings:

71% oppose increasing sales, income or other taxes while 27% are in favor that approach.

53% oppose reducing pay or benefits for government workers while 44% are in favor.

48% opposed reducing or eliminating government programs while 47% were in favor of cuts.

Despite the opposition to reducing spending or raising taxes, those surveyed agreed overwhelmingly that their state faces a budget crisis. Sixty-four percent said their state was in financial crisis while only 5% said it wasn't. The rest were unsure.

I think we need to add a new political category to NIMBYs and BANANAs:  DNAs, for "Do Nothing to Anyone".  That group comprises, to a first approximation, the entire American electorate.  Which explains a lot about our fiscal policy.

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