Like George Will, I think tax reform is a good idea. Like Republican Rep. Dave Camp, soon-to-be chair of the House committee that would steer tax reform, I think it should include broadening of the base and lowering of some tax rates on earned income and corporate income. Like both George Will and Dave Camp, it concerns me that nearly half the country doesn't pay federal income taxes, which pays for most of the non-Social Security budget.

But if I'm reading this sentence correctly, it's asking for something ill-advised:

Many conservatives, including Camp, believe that although most Americans should be paying lower taxes, more Americans should be paying taxes.

Let's spell this out. More Americans should be paying taxes means the bottom 40 percent, which currently pays no income taxes, should pay more income taxes. Most Americans should be paying lower taxes means the other half -- which can only mean the top half -- should pay lower taxes. Lower taxes for the rich; higher taxes for the poor. Can that sentence mean anything else?

For the record, I think more Americans should be paying taxes and more Americans should be paying more.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.