The OECD has some harsh suggestions for resolving the blooming financial crisis in the Eurozone. After sifting through the report, our friends at 24/7 Wall St find that the most aggressive suggestion is to sanction countries that don't keep their books in order and even to strip weaker economies of their financial independence:

The OECD is in favor of what some nations such as Germany have discussed but are not in a position to implement:

Sanctions should range from intrusive surveillance and warnings by the Council to financial sanctions. Consideration should be given to other measures to increase the costs of taking fiscal risks through non-compliance with EU fiscal requirements, such as making treatment in financial regulations less favourable...

The OECD proposal about how Europe must resolve its debt problems which differ significantly from nation to nation is that a sort of economic servitude is in the future of Greece and perhaps other countries. The OECD has no power to enforce its recommendations, but it has made a clear argument that Europe really has no other choice unless its wants it weaker nations to drag down the financial fortunes of the entire region.

Read the full story at 24/7 Wall St.

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