The New York Times' David Streitfeld has an illuminating piece on the the Maine home that triggered a sensation over the banks' foreclosure practices. Read the full story, but the crux is here:

Mrs. Bradbury's foreclosure file did not look right. The documents from the lender, GMAC Mortgage, were approved by an employee whose title was "limited signing officer," an indication to the lawyer that his knowledge of the case was effectively nonexistent.

Mr. Cox eventually won the right to depose the employee, who casually acknowledged that he had prepared 400 foreclosures a day for GMAC and that contrary to his sworn statements, they had not been reviewed by him or anyone else.

GMAC, the country's fourth-largest mortgage lender, called this omission a technicality but was forced last month to halt foreclosures in the 23 states, including Maine, where they must be approved by a court. Bank of America, JPMorgan Chase and other lenders that used robo-signers -- the term caught on instantly -- have enacted their own freezes.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.