It's pretty obvious that economic uncertainty makes for a dangerous time to invest in the stock market. After all, prices are heavily dependent on whether the economy strengthens or worsens. But considering how low bonds yields have gotten recently, driven by ultra-low interest rates, fixed income doesn't seem like a great alternative either. It turns out, however, that uncertainty has done something positive for equity investors. With firms not knowing what to do with their cash, they've increased dividends. They're now beating bond yields by the most in 15 years. Lynn Thomasson, Rita Nazareth and Whitney Kisling of Bloomberg explain:

The combination of record-low interest rates, potential profit growth of 36 percent this year and a slowing economy has forced investors into the relative value reversal. For John Carey of Pioneer Investment Management and Federated Investors Inc.'s Linda Duessel, whose firms oversee $566 billion, it means stocks are cheap after companies raised payouts by 6.8 percent in the second quarter, data compiled by Bloomberg show.

Read the full story at Bloomberg.

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