The United States is still trying stimulus. Britain is moving toward austerity. But even if our recession-busting methods are different, our economies are speaking the same language, and telling us the same thing: this year is not going well.

You've got financial fragility ...

Business and consumer sentiment have shown signs of softening, measures of financial fragility remain elevated and there is great uncertainty about the outlook for ... our most important trading partner, the euro area.

You've got depressed lending...

Lawmakers and business owners ... have criticized banks for being reluctant to lend and slowing down an economic recovery. But lenders [say] demand for loans had declined as businesses prefer to repay debt rather than seek new credit.

You're got worries about regulations...

Some analysts also have said banks will be more cautious as long as it is unclear how new banking regulations will affect them.

You've got recent deterioration..

After some improvements at the beginning of the year, economic indicators have started to deteriorate again ...

You've got sinking consumer confidence...

Or this: An index for consumer confidence in Britain fell for a third month in July and dropped to the lowest level since April 2009

Every single sentence is from a story about England, a country led by a conservative government that announced large spending cuts a month ago and is pursuing a path of austerity. But every single sentence above is also true of the United States.

Stories like Matt Continetti's "The Zombie Economy" seeking to blame Obama for the state of the recovery make me think some conservatives could benefit from the consumption of more brains. Did Obama drive the economy into a ditch? Did he take the private sector and bite it with his zombie teeth and give it a zombie flu and turn it into a living undead thing that's bleeding undead blood from open wounds? There is a possibility that he did all of that. Zombie historians shall judge.

But there is also the possibility that we, like our motherland across the pond, simply went through a backbreaking downturn that started in the heart of our capital markets, and that the scars from the financial crisis have not healed, and that broad unemployment combined with jitters among business owners and investors emerging from the near-death experience of 2008, have simply put the economy is a very deep hole.

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