As Spain grapples with 20 percent unemployment, the country's famous, and famously gratuitous, state-subsidized bullfights have taken a skewering:

Hordes of humans will sprint ahead of thundering beasts this week at Pamplona's famed running of the bulls, but Spain's most storied fiesta is being overshadowed by a crisis in the bullring.

Across Spain, the number of bullfights has dropped from about 1,000 in 2008 to a projected 800 or less this year, as local governments that have always subsidized small-town bullfights cut budgets because of declining tax revenue.

Bullfights, or corridas in Spanish, have become a luxury when cuts must be made by town councils to maintain funding for schools, social programs and road repairs.

Read the full story at CBS.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.