A new survey finds workers are more productive in LEED-certified buildings, because they have cleaner air, clearer lighting, better temperature control, and fewer pollutants. Sounds intuitive, but it seems likely that companies that can afford new LEED-certified buildings can afford better trained, more productive workers, so I'm not ready to go to the bank with the greener-buildings/better-workers hypothesis.

I'm more interested in this specific finding:

  • Temperature matters. Performance increases with temperatures up to 60-72 F (21-22 C) and decreases with temps above 73-75 F (23-24 C). The highest productivity is at 71.6 F (22 C). (The optimal environment is one where the individual occupant can control the temperature.)
  • Temperature matters. Performance increases with temperatures up to 60-72 F (21-22 C) and decreases with temps above 73-75 F (23-24 C). The highest productivity is at 71.6 F (22 C). (The optimal environment is one where the individual occupant can control the temperature.)
  • Temperature matters. Performance increases with temperatures up to 60-72 F (21-22 C) and decreases with temps above 73-75 F (23-24 C). The highest productivity is at 71.6 F (22 C). (The optimal environment is one where the individual occupant can control the temperature.)
  • Temperature matters. Performance increases with temperatures up to 60-72 F (21-22 C) and decreases with temps above 73-75 F (23-24 C). The highest productivity is at 71.6 F (22 C). (The optimal environment is one where the individual occupant can control the temperature.)

    The more frigid the better, as far as I'm concerned. If I blogged from the Arctic circle, I think you'd see output double.

    Read the full story at Green Biz.

  • Temperature matters. Performance increases with temperatures up to 60-72 F (21-22 C) and decreases with temps above 73-75 F (23-24 C). The highest productivity is at 71.6 F (22 C). (The optimal environment is one where the individual occupant can control the temperature.)
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