If this is true, it's pretty incredible:

Berry recounted meetings with White House officials, reminiscent of some during the Clinton days, where he and others urged them not to force Blue Dogs "off into that swamp" of supporting bills that would be unpopular with voters back home.

"I've been doing that with this White House, and they just don't seem to give it any credibility at all," Berry said. "They just kept telling us how good it was going to be. The president himself, when that was brought up in one group, said, 'Well, the big difference here and in '94 was you've got me.' We're going to see how much difference that makes now." [snip]

"I began to preach last January that we had already seen this movie and we didn't want to see it again because we know how it comes out," said Arkansas' 1st District congressman, who worked in the Clinton administration before being elected to the House in 1996... "I just began to have flashbacks to 1993 and '94. No one that was here in '94, or at the day after the election felt like. It certainly wasn't a good feeling."

There has been some disagreement among political analysts that I trust as to whether Obama's advisors started believing their own propaganda--whether they really believed that everything had changed, and they were FDR 2.0.  But this suggests an arrogance far beyond that.  This suggests that Obama genuinely believed that he was entirely untouchable.  That may explain a lot about the past twelve months.

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