Brit Hume, with all the inane earnestness he can muster, advising Tiger Woods:

"The extent to which he can recover seems to me depends on his faith," Hume said. "He is said to be a Buddhist. I don't think that faith offers the kind of forgiveness and redemption that is offered by the Christian faith. My message to Tiger would, 'Tiger, turn to the Christian faith and you can make a total recovery and be a great example to the world."

Perhaps Tiger Woods and Brit Hume are great friends. But if they are, it seems that this is the sort of advice you deliver in private, not before an audience of millions. Thus assuming that they are not great friends, I don't know how anyone of actual sincere faith takes to television to revel in this kind of blank-minded idoltry.

Here is religion as chauvinism, and some will argue that all it ever is. I don't know. Nor do I know much about Buddhism, and I would bet the same about Hume. He should stick to his area of expertise, whatever that might be. Televangelist to the stars does not suit him. He lacks the allure. He lacks the luster.

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