I believe that I pass  Ta-Nehisi's test, hating, as I do, the decade's most sterile, reductionist movie:

But more than a bad film, Crash, which won an Oscar (!),  is the apotheosis of a kind of unthinking, incurious, nihilistic, multiculturalism. To be blunt, nothing tempers my extremism more than watching a fellow liberal exhort the virtues of Crash.

If you're angry about race, but not particularly interested in understanding why, you probably like Crash. If you're black and believe in the curative qualities of yet another "dialogue around race," you probably liked Crash. If you're white and voted for Barack Obama strictly because he was black, you probably liked Crash. If you've ever used the term "post-racial" or "post-black" in a serious conversation, without a hint of irony, you probably liked Crash.

I know a lot of white people in L.A. who think that "Crash" represents an accurate depiction of the way blacks and whites relate to each other. These are white people who live in the Hancock Park neighborhood, mainly, though not exclusively.

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