Yesterday, I briefly considered what the biggest business news stories were this year, and gave readers an opportunity to vote on which they believed was the most important. If you haven't voted, you still can. As I write this, unemployment is winning, with half of voters choosing it as the most important story of the year. I agree. But what about next year? It looks like business and economics are gearing up to lead headlines again in 2010. Which will be the most important? Vote after the jump!

From how things are shaping up, there have been few years that face as much uncertainty for business as 2010. Will the economy really recover? Will unemployment decline significantly? Can the stock market continue its upward trend?

I can think of a few possible contenders from what I've been reading in the latter part of the year. Some worry about commercial real estate's future. That would be my pick for the year's biggest story. Inflation has also got many people worried, though I suspect that it will remain low through 2010, though 2011 is a bigger question mark. The recession double-dipping is also feared by some, as GDP could decline again if some factor prevents recovery.

As far as government policy relating to business goes, cap and trade might make progress in 2010. Sweeping financial regulation will be passed in some form. The deficit will also probably make news, as Republicans will almost certainly use it as a focal point during November's midterm elections. The Federal Reserve should also continue to attract media attention as it begins its exit strategy.

As far as particular industries go, several stories could be huge. Green energy technology should continue to grab a lot of headlines. Will big banks prove their health, or go back to the government, hat in hand? We may also learn whether the housing market has hit the bottom, and whether it begins to bounce back.

Look deeply into your crystal balls and vote below!

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