Apparently Rush Limbaugh has called Sarah Palin's book "truly one of the most substantive policy books I've read".  Personally, I thought it was the finest spy novel since Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy.

Before you start bashing me for being an elitist liberal, let me point out that I'm not objecting to Rush Limbaugh praising the book, or saying anything about Sarah Palin.  I'm just sayin', politicians do not write policy books, much less substantive ones . . . except Al Gore, and his book was terrible.  Also, given what a rotten campaigner he is, I'm not sure it's even fair to call him a politician. 

But I digress.  The point is, Palin's book is not supposed to be a policy treatise.  It's a political memoir.  It may be a very fine political memoir, for all I know.  So why not say that, rather than claim it's a sterling example of some genre it was never intended to be? 

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