The acting CFO of Freddie Mac has been found dead in his basement, an apparent suicide.  He's one of the executive team who has been clashing with regulators over how much to disclose about the ways the government has been running the company for its benefit, rather than that of the shareholders. 

The pressure of his job, the public spotlight, and the clashes with regulators probably contributed to this.  But there's no reason to blame either the regulators, or some dark scandal, as I imagine some commentators will try to.  Kellerman wasn't tainted by the entity's earlier problems, and you don't commit suicide because you're mad at regulators.  You commit suicide because you have deep mental health issues. 

Still, this isn't exactly going to make it easier to put Freddie Mac back together.  It's an institution with deep problems that seem to be getting worse, rather than better. 

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.