Check out these two passages:

Doctors fear return of Steve Jobs's pancreatic cancer by David Rose, Times of London, January 15th, 2009

In 2003 Mr Jobs learned that he had a malignant tumour in his pancreas - a large gland behind the stomach that supplies the body with insulin and digestive enzymes. The most common type of pancreatic cancer - adenocarcinoma - carries a life expectancy of about a year. Mr Jobs was lucky; he had an extremely rare form called an islet cell neuroendocrine tumour that can be treated surgically, without radiation or chemotherapy.

Mr Jobs tried various alternative therapies for nine months before the tumour was taken out in July 2004, at the Stanford University Medical Clinic in Palo Alto, near his home. "This weekend I underwent a successful surgery to remove a cancerous tumour from my pancreas," he wrote in an e-mail to Apple's staff the next week.

It is thought that his surgery was a variation on the Whipple procedure in which surgeons typically remove the right-most section, or "head," of the pancreas - as well as the gallbladder, part of the stomach, the lower half of the bile duct and part of the small intestine - and then reassemble the system in a new configuration. 

The severed surfaces of the stomach, bile duct, and remaining pancreas are stitched to the small intestine so that what is left of the pancreas can continue to supply insulin and digestive enzymes.

Why Does Steve Jobs Look So Thin? by Philip Elmer-DeWitt, Fortune, June 13th, 2008

In 2003 Jobs learned that he had a malignant tumor in his pancreas - a large gland behind the stomach that supplies the body with insulin and digestive enzymes. The most common type of pancreatic cancer - adenocarcinoma - carries a life expectancy of about a year. Jobs was lucky; he had an extremely rare form called an islet cell neuroendocrine tumor that can be treated surgically, without radiation or chemotherapy.

As Fortune reported in a March 5 cover story, ("The trouble with Steve Jobs"), Jobs tried various alternative therapies for nine months before the tumor was taken out on July 31, 2004, at the Stanford University Medical Clinic in Palo Alto, near his home.

"This weekend I underwent a successful surgery to remove a cancerous tumor from my pancreas," Jobs wrote in an e-mail to Apple's staff the next week. "I will be recuperating during the month of August, and expect to return to work in September."

The Fortune article reported - and Apple has not disputed - that his surgery was a variation on the Whipple procedure, or a pancreatoduodenectomy, the most common operation for pancreatic cancer.

Nobody who has a Whipple is ever quite the same.

The Whipple procedure, named for Allen Oldfather Whipple, the American doctor who perfected it in the 1930s, is a complex, Rube Goldberg-type operation in which surgeons remove the right-most section, or "head," of the pancreas - as well as the gallbladder, part of the stomach, the lower half of the bile duct, and part of the small intestine - and then reassemble the whole thing in a new configuration. The severed surfaces of the stomach, bile duct, and remaining pancreas are stitched to the small intestine so that what's left of the pancreas can continue to supply insulin and digestive enzymes.

I came across this totally randomly--linked to the Elmer-DeWitt account to explain his 9 month dalliance with alternative therapies, then googled for updated news, and thought:  "Wait a minute, I've read this somewhere before".  It's possible that this is not plagiarism--that David Rose is actually Philip Elmer-DeWitt's alter ego and thus owns the copyright to that passage, or that Mr Rose meant to attribute the passage and the html somehow got screwed up.  But it certainly doesn't look good.  I've emailed the Times for comment, and will report as I get any information.

Update Mike Harvey emailed to explain.


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