A few days ago, Obama was promising that 95% of working people would get a tax cut.  The House has scaled that back to make it more affordable.  It will be interested to see how the burgeoning young professional class that disproportionately supported Obama--the folks who are making good money, but living in expensive cities and still struggling with rent and loans--will take this.

The rest of the bill is about what you expected--a lot of probably useless green energy spending that I fairly confidently predict will come to nothing, some stuff we should have done anyway, and a bunch of pandering, porky highway spending.  The better the projects are, the less likely they are to be stimulative, because they're complicated and time consuming, like healthcare IT and high-speed rail.  If we do them on a stimulus timeframe, we'll screw them up, waste an enormous amount of money, and likely make American voters worse off in the long term by locking them in to bad solutions--we won't get a second bite at high-speed rail between LA and San Francisco.   Mostly, Democrats took their wish lists, called them "stimulus", and look set to inflict them on the American people in badly done drag. 

Now, what does that remind me off?  Rhymes with Whoosh Max Butts, I think . . .

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