But apparently not:

So let me get this straight, your son should be rewarded for telling the truth, and he really doesn't hate blacks, because he supposedly has a black friend. You would think that maybe, just possibly, one or two of those black friends that you claim he socializes with, would have told him that it might not be a good idea to burn a cross as a sign of love, respect or camaraderie. When most people want to be friendly to new people in the neighbourhood, they stop by with a cake, or a pie even.

Call me crazy but burning a cross just doesn't seem to say welcome to the neighbourhood. Perhaps all of the images popularized in the media of men in white sheets burning crosses just looked like some kind of weird celebration of Halloween. Maybe he believed that when they were screaming, "white power" as the crosses burned they were making a statement about how wonderful bleach is at keeping whites, white and not actually pushing a racial agenda.



I favor brownies, myself. That way, they can eat them even if they haven't unpacked the silverware yet.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.