So yes, when the 3G version comes out, I'm buying an iPhone. Yes, I know the arguments for the Blackberry, etc. But my hands are a little large for those tiny keyboard keys. And I'm trying to pare down how much I carry. Consolidating my modest PDA needs, MP3 player, and phone into one advice will make amazing progress towards this worthy goal. Ideally, I will have only six items in my blogger bag:

1) Macbook Pro
2) Kindle
3) iPhone
4) USB headset
5) Broadband modem
6) Digital camera

I know what you're thinking: this bag is an invitation to one hell of a mugging, and also, needs a cappucino frothing attachment. But The Atlantic is a Mac shop. I am still not a Mac evangelical--unlike my colleague, I was perfectly happy with my Sony Vista laptop, at least after I uninstalled the crap Sony loaded on there. But just as I couldn't blog American and write British for The Economist, I found it too annoying to switch back and forth between platforms. That means that I favor Apple products.

There's also the fact that the ubiquity of the iPhone means that there's lots of development for the iPhone. My iPod accessories all work with it. Driving back from North Carolina, a friend not only played music from his iPhone through my little Belkin iPod car dock, but also used its quasi-GPS to get us unlost. At this point my heart was lost. The new one is rumored to have actual GPS.

Besides, I am perfectly fascinated by the hype surrounding the iPhone. It's not just the probably-fake photographs, the speculation about the exact day it will go on sale, or the uncomfortable mental picture of all those salivating mac-bloggers. It's just the sheer, amazing lengths to which people will go to get information about the damn thing. For the first time in my life, I'm planning to take part in one of these events, and buy my phone on the first day of release--whenever that might be--not because I can't wait two days to get a new phone, but because I want to enjoy the show. And thanks to the broadband modem, I'll be liveblogging it.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.