It's spring, and I'm feeling frivolous. I didn't watch the debate last night, out of a strong feeling that shutting myself inside with all that bland bloviation might drive me to madness. Luckily, the debateblogging makes it crystal clear that I missed nothing except the opportunity to snark at two exhausted politicians.

Instead I had a drink outside (mmmm-fresh cut grass), during which I got debate with a friend on the critical question: would you download your consciousness into a robot?

There are, of course, a lot of factors to consider. How good is the robot? Is it more attractive/stronger/faster than you? What's the MTTF? How good are your backup systems? Will you still enjoy normal human pleasures like eating? What about sleeping?

Then there's the question of tradeoffs, which becomes particularly difficult if we posit a robot self that is in some way less than idea. Do you download now, or like a lapsed Catholic, wait until you are near death and try to pull out a last-minute save? Is a few more years of gourmet meals worth the risk of a Sudden, Unexpected Mortality Event? And do you really want to live forever? Wouldn't you get bored?

I open the question to my readers: robot consciousness--yea or nay? Now or never? And how many of you would be willing to count on a death's door Hail Mary pass?

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