The Washington Post has a follow-up on Dean Baker's complaint about its Mexican GDP calculations (I blogged the story here). The Editorial Board's defense: it took the figures from a presentation by a Mexican economist. This is not much of a defense, about like "I was sooooooooooooo drunk!" The first rule of economics journalism is Always Adjust for Currency Changes, and a real quadrupling of GDP in 20 years implies a growth rate of over 7% a year, which is just obviously not the case in Mexico. But they also point out that Dean Baker made some sizeable errors, as well as cherry picking a not-terrifically-appropriate statistic in order to give the lowest possible figure to contrast with the WaPo's ridiculously high one. All in all, no one's really covered in glory.

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