Scott Adams asks:


I also envision a sport I call Bumper Soccer. It’s based on the most fun I ever had while participating in something resembling a sport. When I was an undergrad at Hartwick College, in Oneonta NY, we played soccer year round. In the winter, we played in the gym. And when the gym was taken, we sometimes found the door unlocked to a small exercise room with a low ceiling, a number of padded support columns, and a rubbery floor. We used it, quite illegally, for soccer. It was ridiculous fun, because the walls and columns added a dimension to the game. To beat a player, you could do a give-and-go off the wall or a column. And because the space was small, you were always near the action. A few times we played with more than one ball at the same time. It was frantic and amazing and great exercise. You ended up laughing the entire time. And the small space and columns were a great equalizer for different levels of skill. Speed and height didn’t count for much in there. We usually played coed.

Best yet, from a business perspective, it packed a lot of people into a small space. I often wonder what I would pay per hour to reproduce that experience, and it’s a lot.

What’s your best idea for indoor recreation that does not involve sex?



I've always wondered why someone doesn't buy cheap wood furniture and glassware by the cargo container, rent out safety outfits, and let people whack the hell out of stuff with big hammers. We're a stress laden society. And who hasn't, when some inanimate object has stubbed their toe or otherwise thwarted them, wanted to vent their rage by destroying it? I'm also a big fan of plinking nearly empty aerosol cans with .22 rifles, and those have to be pretty cheap to acquire. America needs more outlets for its destructive tendencies that don't involve wrecking other places, or our own economy.

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