Leslie C. Stevens

  • The Grand Trunk Road to Agra

    A graduate of Annapolis, VICE ADMIRAL LESLIE C. STEVENS, USN (Ret.), combined two careers during his thirty-six years of active serviceone in the development of naval aviation and our great carriers; the other in foreign intelligence. His memorable book, Russian Assignment, is told almost entirely in terms of the hundreds of vivid encounters which befell him in Moscow and the provinces while he was our Naval Attaché. Now he applies the same powerful observation and style to that road which runs for 1500 miles across India.

  • Russian Assignment

    A graduate of Annapolis, VICE ADMIRAL LESLIE C. STEVEVS, USN (Ret.), served in the Navy for thirty-six years as a specialist in naval aviation and foreign intelligence. In 1917,while still in the Academy,he began his study of Russian history. He learned to read and write the language and when, in 1947, he was sent to Moscow as our naval attaché, he was able as few of our representatives are to meet the Russians on their own terms. During his years of duty in the country,he talked to people in all walks of life, and from his maltitudinous encounters has come his new book, Russian Assignment, which has just appeared under the Atlantic-Little, Brown imprint. It is a big book and a memorable one, and we wish our readers to realize that the episodes selected for the Atlantic comprise approximately one ninth of the total text.

  • Russian Assignment

    A graduate of Annapolis, VICE ADMIRAL LESLIE C. STEVEAS, USN (Ret.), served in the Navy for thirty-six years as a specialist in naval aviation and foreign intelligence. In 1917, while still in the Academy, he began his study of Russian history. He learned to read and write the language and when, in 1947, he was sent to Moscow as our naval attaché, he was able as few of our representatives are to meet the Russians on their own terms. During his years of duty in the country, he talked to the people in all walks of life, often under observation, but finding numerous opportunities for unsupervised conversations. From his continuous encounters with the Russian people, he has written a book, Russian Assignment, which will be published under our imprint soon, and from which the Atlantic is drawing four installments.

  • Russian Assignment

    A graduate of Annapolis, VICE ADMIRAL LESLIE C. STEVENS, USN (Ret.), served in the Navy for thirty-six years as a specialist in naval aviation and foreign intelligence. In 1917, while still in the Academy, he began his study of Russian history. He learned to read and write the language and when, in 1947, he was sent to Moscow as our naval attaché, he was able as few of our representatives are to meet the Russians on their own terms. During his years of duty in the country, he talked to the people in all walks of life, often under observation, but finding numerous opportunities for unsupervised conversations. From his continuous encounters with the Russian people, he has written a book, Russian Assignment, which will be published under our imprint in October and from which the Atlantic is drawing several extended installments.

  • Russian Assignment

    A graduate of Annapolis, VICE ADMIRAL LESLIE C. STEVENS, USN (Ret.), served in the Navy for thirty-six years as a specialist in naval aviation and foreign intelligence. In 1917, while still in the Academy’, he began his study of Russian history. He learned to read and write the language and when, in 1917, he uas sent to Moscow as our naval attache, he was able, as few of our representatives are, to meet the Russians on their own terms. During his years of duty in the country, he talked to people in all walks of life, often under observation, but finding numerous opportunities for unsupervised conversations. From his continuous encounters with the Russian people, he has written a book, Russian Assignment, which will be published under our imprint in October and from which the Atlantic will draw several extended installments.

  • The Russian Doctrine

    A graduate of Annapolis and a lifelong student of the Russian language and literature , VICE ADMIRAL LESLIE C. STEVENS, USN (Ret.), was Naval Attaché to Moscow from the summer of 1947 to the end of 1919. TV hiJe he teas in Russia he talked with Russians in all walks of life and,subject to the usual difficulties,traveled to Central Siberia and Transcaucasia. To the May Allantic he contributed his first article,on the Russian People. Now he discusses the Doctrine which the Kremlin has enforced.

  • The Russian People

    A graduate of Annapolis who has also earned degrees from Nebraska Weslevan University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, VICE ADMIRAL LESLIE C. STEVENS, USN (Ret.), served in the Navy for thirty-six years and during that time combined two careers — one in the development of naval aviation and its carriers, and the other in foreign intelligence. A lifelong student of the Russian language, literature, and culture, he was Naval Attaché to Moscow from the summer of 1947 to the end of 1949. While in Russia he talked with Russians in all walks of life and, subject to the usual difficulties, traveled as far as central Siberia and Transcaucasia.