Josephine Johnson

  • May Morning

    JOSEPHINE JOHNSON is a native of Missouri whose first short story appeared in theAtlantic and who won the Pulitzer Prize with her beautifully descriptive novel, Now in November. Four years ago, she and her husband bought three acres on the outskirts of Cincinnati and a majestic house a hundred and thirty years old. There were bats in the atticuncounted thousands who did not wish to be dislodged; and that struggle Miss Johnson described in her memorable article,Tenants of the House” (August, 1952). In the essay that follows she depicts the explorations which beckon on a May morning in Ohio.

  • October Frost

    Josephine Johnson is a native of Missouri whose first short story appeared in the Atlantic and who won the Pulitzer Prize with her beautifully descriptive novel, Now in November. Three years ago, she and her husband bought a majestic house a hundred and thirty years old on the outskirts of Cincinnati. In this essay she depicts the explorations which she and her children have carried out in the early autumn on their three surrounding acres.

  • September Harvest

    JOSEPHINE JOHNSON is a native of Missouri whose first short story appeared in the Atlantic and who won the Pulitzer Prize with her beautifully descriptive novel, Now in November. Three years ago, she and her husband bought three acres on the outskirts of Cincinnati and a majestic house a hundred and thirty years old. There were bats in the atticuncounted thousands who did not wish to be dislodged; and that struggle Miss Johnson described in her memorable article, “Tenants of the House” (August, 1952). Now, in a series of fresh essays, she depicts the explorations which she and her children have carried out in the summer and early autumn.

  • The Month of the Locust

    JOSEPHINE JOHNSON is a native of Missouri whose first short story appeared in the Atlantic and who won the Pulitzer Prize with her beautifully descriptive novel, Now in November. Some time ago, she and her husband, Grant Cannon, bought three acres on the outskirts of Cincinnati and a majestic house a hundred and thirty years old. There were bats in the atticuncounted thousands who did not wish to be dislodged; and that struggle Miss Johnson described in her memorable article, “Tenants of the House(August, 1952). Now, in a series of fresh essays, she depicts the explorations which she and her children have carried out in the summer and early autumn.

  • Tenants of the House

    JOSEPHINE JOHNSON is a native of Missouri whose first published short story appeared in the Atlantic and who won the Pulitzer Prize for 1934 with her beautifully descriptive novel, Now in November. Two years ago she and her husband, Grant Cannon, moved into an old house on the outskirts of Cincinnati, and the events which transpired in the first summer of their occupancy were enough to destroy her peace of mind and that of the hardiest of her friends. Her story is trueevery eerie word of it.

  • August Evening

  • His Children

  • The Stranger

  • The Quiet Ones