Joseph Whitehill

  • Bobby

    A weekend at the lake with his young nephew seemed innocuous enough, but this Samaritan did not know a simple fact about Bobby: he is an unforgettable monster. Mr. Whitehill’s most recent novel, PRECIOUS LITTLE, has just been published by Scribner’s.

  • Young Man With a Spear

    An engineer who served in the Navy during the war, JOSEPH WHITEHILL,now in his thirtieth year, has settled on the eastern shore of Maryland to devote his full time to wrting.Able Bakerwas his first story to appear in the Atlantic, and it won him an Atlantic award and a place in the Prize Stories of 1956. A collection of his best narratives, entitled Able Baker and Others, has just been published in book form under the Atlantic—Little. Brown imprint, and rumor has it that he is well along with his first novel.

  • Terry Bindle

    An engineer who studied at Harvard and the University of Tulsa, JOSEPH wHITEHILL two years ago turned to full-time writing. Moved by his Navy memories and by his respect for the work of Joseph Conrad, Mr. Whitehill wrote a sea story called “Able Baker’ which won an Atlantic '"’First" award and was reprinted in the 0. Henry Prize Stories, 1956. The following narrative is another high point in the life of Able Baker.

  • Rat Trap

    In engineer who studied at Harvard and the University of Tulsa, JOSEPH WHITEHILL two years ago turned to full-time writing. Waved by his Nary memories arul by his respect for the tvorh oj Joseph Conrad. Mr. Whitchill wrote a sea story called “Able Bakerwhich icon an Atlantic “First” award and is being reprinted in the 0. Henry Prize Stories, 1956. The following narrative is another high point in the life of Able Baker.

  • The Academicians

    An engineer who studied at Harvard and the University of Tulsa, JOSEPH WHITEHILLtwo years ago turned to full-time short-story writing. Moved by his Navy memories and by his respect for the work of Joseph Conrad, Mr. Whitehill wrote a sea story called “Able Bakerwhich we published as an “Atlantic First.” The story’ below, he says, is his respectful bow “to the impossibly beautiful prose of Tsak Dinosen, the mistress of us all.”

  • Able Baker

    JOSEPH WHITEHILL of Topeka, Kansas, who makes his first appearance in the Atlantic aw/ it’i/Z certainly be heard from again, is a seafarer who has gone inland to do his writing. “Noting in the Writer‘s Yearbook,” he wrote in his accompanying letter, “that the Atlantic ʽFirst‘ section is reserved for unestablished writers, I beg to call your attention to the fact that I am about as unestablished as you can get and still be eating.”