Eudora Welty

Eudora Welty
Eudora Welty was a short story writer and novelist known for her portrayals of the American South. She received the 1973 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction for her novel The Optimist’s Daughter.
  • Must the Novelist Crusade?

    A Mississippian who early established herself as one of the abler writers of her generation, Eudora Welty has contributed many fine things to the ATLANTIC, including her stories “A Worn Path,” “Powerhouse,” and “Why I Live at the P.O.,” and her short novel

  • The Reading and Writing of Short Stories

    A Southerner born in Jackson, Mississippi, and educated at the Mississippi State College for Women, the University of Wisconsin, and Columbia, EUDORA WELTY is one of the most versatile and talented of our shortstory writers. The Atlantic has published some of her best work: her Negro stories, “A Worn Path" and “Livvie Is Back(winner of the O. Henry Award in 1942); “Powerhouse,”her unforgettable picture of a jazz band; “Hello and Good-bye,” with its melting butter account of a Southern beauty contest. Beginning writers will measure their experiences with those which she recounted in the February Atlantic and continues here.

  • The Reading and Writing of Short Stories

    A Southerner born in Jackson, Mississippi, and educated at the Mississippi State College for Women, the University of Wisconsin, and Columbia, EUDORA WELTY is one of the most versatile and talented of our shortstory writers. The Allan tic takes pride in having published some of her best work: her Negro stories, “A Worn Ptith" and “Livvie Is Back" (winner of the O. Henry Award in 1912); “Powerhouse.”her unforgettable picture of a jazz band; “Hello and Good-bye,”with its melting butter account of a Southern beauty contest. Beginning writers will be sure to measure their experiences in the craft with those which she now recounts.

  • Shower of Gold

    Seven years ago, EUDORA WELTYmade her first appearance in the Atlantic with “A Worn Path.”That story was ultimately to receive an O. Henry Award, but more important, it proclaimed the arrival of a young and talented Southern writer. Miss Welty was born in Jackson, Mississippi, attended Mississippi State College for Women, the University of Wisconsin, where she was graduated, and Columbia University School of Business. Then she “edged on back home” to do her short stories and her novels, A Curtain of Green and Delta Wedding.

  • Hello and Good-Bye

  • Delta Wedding

    SUMMARY. — Laura McRaven, nine, arrives at Shellmound, plantation home of her dead mother’s brother, Battle Fairchild, in the Mississippi Delta, during the late summer of 1923. The family consists of Battle and Ellen, their eight children ranging from Shelley, eighteen, to Bluet, two; the old aunts, Mac and Shannon; and dead brother Denis’s child, Maureen, not quite right in her head from injury in infancy. Two more sisters of Battle’s, the old maids Primrose and Jim Allen, live at a near-by plantation; Tempe Summers, his oldest sister, has come from Inverness with her grandchild, Lady Clare Buchanan.

  • Delta Wedding

    SUMMARY. — Laura McRaven, nine, arrives at Shellmound, plantation home of her dead mother’s brother, Battle Fairchild, in the Mississippi Delta, during the late summer of 1923. The family consists of Battle and Ellen, their eight children ranging from Shelley, eighteen, to Bluet, two; the old aunts, Mac and Shannon; and dead brother Denis’s child, Maureen, not quite right in her head from injury in infancy. Two more sisters of Battle’s, the old maids Primrose and Jim Allen, live at a near-by plantation; Tempe Summers, his oldest sister, has come from Inverness with her grandchild, Lady Clare Buchanan,
    The family are preparing for the wedding of Dabney, seventeen, to Troy Flavin, the Shellmound overseer. George, Battle’s younger brother from Memphis, the adored one of the family, has just brought the news that his wife Robbie Reid (whom the family considers as “common” as Troy) has left him. Robbie, unknown to all but Shelley and Troy, who has advised her to go back to her husband, reaches the town of Fairchilds and comes out on foot through the fields to the door of Shellmound.

  • Delta Wedding

  • Delta Weeding

    The Atlantic published EUDORA WELTY’S first contribution to its pages, her story “A Worn Path,” four years ago this month. That story was ultimately to receive an O. Henry Award. But more than that, it proclaimed the arrival of an American author in whom the South must take exceptional pride. In her middle thirties and as modest as she is talented, Miss Welty has this to say about her early career: —

  • A Sketching Trip

  • Livvie Is Back

  • Powerhouse

  • Why I Live at the P. O

  • Eric Thayer / Reuters

    A Worn Path

    A short story