Erich Leinsdorf

  • What Makes Opera Run

    Of the nearly four thousand operas that have been produced on stage, only forty or fifty have survived in current repertory. Boston Symphony conductor Erich Leinsdorf was for many years a conductor of opera at the Metropolitan in New York and abroad. In this first of two articles he writes about the shortcomings and the virtues that spell failure or enduring popularity.

  • Operas That Survive

  • The Genius of Richard Strauss

    Born and schooled in Vienna, Erich Leinsdorf, conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra for the last three seasons, has a particular affinity for the music of Bichard Strauss. His immense experience and his intellectual perception give him a unique position in the world of music.

  • The Role of the Musical Conductor

    Born in Vienna in 1912, ERICH LEINSDORF studied piano, cello, and composition at the State Academy of Music and at the age of twenty-two became assistant to Dr. Bruno Walter and later lo Toscanini at the Salzburg Festival. After three seasons of opera and concerts in Europe, he came to the United States as assistant conductor at the Metropolitan Opera in New York. Since then he has made an international career of conducting opera and symphony orchestras and is now music consultant on the staff of the Metropolitan Opera.

  • The Education of a Young Conductor

    Born in Vienna in 1912, ERICH LEINSDORF studied piano, cello, and composition at the State Academy of Music, and at the ape of twenty-two became assistant to Dr. Bruno Walter and later to Toscanini at the Salzburg Festival. After three seasons of opera and concerts in Bologna, Trieste, Florence, and San Remo, he came to the United States, where he was engaged as assistant conductor at the Metropolitan Opera in New York. Since then he has made an international career of conducting opera and symphony orchestras, and this season is his eighth as permanent conductor of the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra.

  • Music