David L. Cohn

David I. Cohn was a regular Atlantic contributor during the mid-1900s. A Mississippi native who studied at the University of Virginia and Yale, he authored books as diverse as African American history (God Shakes Creation), American industry (The Good Old Days), and and matrimony (Love in America).
  • Soviet Trade Relations: Exploitation, Not Aid

    A native of Greenville, Mississippi, who was educated at Yale, DAVID L. COHN is an author, world traveler, and economist, and one of the shrewdest political observers in Washington today. His books include an authoritative study of Southern economics, THE LIFE AND TIMES OF KING COTTON, and a study of the Negro in the South, WHERE I WAS BORN AND RAISED.

  • Our Impoverished Diplomats

    Southern author and economist, DAVID L. COHN points out that the United States, the wealthiest nation in the world, pays its foreign representatives so poorly that the best qualified of them, unless they have private means, are unable to afford the most influential posts.

  • The Communist Approach to Burma

    “The drift of the world is such,”wrote DAVID L. COHN in the Atlantic in June, 1946. “that unless it is arrested, nearly a billion people in the Orient and the Middle East may fall under effective Russian domination within foreseeable time.”Mr. Cohn was in Rangoon again this spring and came away with the chilling conclusion that we are losing Southeast Asia to the Communists faster than he thought possible. And it does not have to be.

  • Southern Cotton and Japan

    A native of the Delta, born and raised in Greenville, Mississippi, DAVID L. COHN as an ardent Southerner early came to realize that cotton has had a more dramatic and at times devastating effect on our national history than any of our other natural resources. On a recent trip to Japan he was appalled by the effect our Southernpressured tariff was having upon one of our most needy customers, Japan. The author of many books, Mr. Cohn has recently sent to press his new volume, The Life and Times of King Cotton, [which will be published by the Oxford University Press in the fall.

  • They Never Break the Law

    A native nf Greenville, Mississippi, and a graduate of Yale, DAVID L. COHN followed the American axiom that only a young man can afford to retire. He scored a quick success in the retail trade of New Orleans, inrested his earnings in a chicken farm, and then net on, to enjoy and report on the world. He is the author of a penetrating study of the White and the Negro entitled Where I Was Born and Raised; a critique of our tariff policy, Picking America’s Pockets; and two volumes of entertaining reminiscence. Love in America and The Good Old Days.

  • Junior, Drop That Japanese Toy!

    A Southerner and a graduate of Yale, DAVID L. COHN scored a solid success in the retail trade of New Orleans beore he became a free-lance writer. His books include Picking America’s Pockets, a volume about our tariff policy’; Where I Was Born and Raised, a study of race relations; a tear diary covering some 10.000 miles with American troops: and two volumes of a lighter nature, The Good Old Days and Love in America.

  • The American Temperament

    A native of Greenville, Mississippi, and a graduate of Yale, DAVID L. COHN has come to judge this country by cosmopolitan standards. In the short paper which follows, he raises a vital question: Have we the right temperament to cope with the responsibilities we have assumed? Mr. Cohn's books include Picking America’s Pockets,a volume about our tariff policy; Where I Was Horn and Raised, a study of race relations; a war diary covering some 40,000 miles; and two volumes of a lighter nature, The Good Old Days and Love in America.

  • Finland Under the Guns

    Last summer DAVID L. COHN, author, far traveler, and fighting Southerner, went north to Finland to see what it was like to live with people who were under Russia s guns. Here are his impressions. Mr. Cohn, who comes from the Delta, has published a penetrating study of the South, entitled Where I Was Born and Raised; during the war, at the request of General Somervell, he undertook a trip of some 10,000 miles to our armies in the various theaters, recording his findings in a diary entitled This Is the Story.

  • Who Will Do the Dirty Work?

    Author, far traveler, and shrewd student of American economics, DAVID L. COHN here scrutinizes a question which has become a subject of pressing importance in American industry ever since the flow of immigration teas halted: Who will or who wants to do the dirty work? Mr. Cohn has published an interesting study of rare relations in the South entitled Where I Was Born and Raised; he is the author of a war diary covering some 10,000 miles, entitled This Is the Story, and two entertaining books, The Good Old Days and Love in America.

  • Moonlight and Poison Ivy

    Author. traveler, andoutspoken observer of American life. DAVID L. COHN is a Southerner, born in Greenville. Mississippi, educated at the University of Virginia and Yale, who has under his signature a study of nice relations in the South, Where I Was Born and Raised; a war diary covering some forty thousand miles. This Is the Story; and two amusing and edifying books on American industry and behavior. The Good Old Days and Love in America.

  • Can Israel Help the Arabs?

    A Mississippian who graduated from Yale, DAVID L. COHN is a free lance who writes with authority on subjects close to his heart. In God Shakes Creation, he wrote of the relations between Negro and white, with a skill which drew the high praise of Sinclair Lewis. He has written about the tariff, about love in America, about Anglo-American relations, and feelingly about anti-Semitism. In 1944-1945, at the behest of General Somervell, Mr. Cohn made an extended trip through the Far and Middle East and saw at first hand the amity between Jew and Arab which despite the recent ruction will, he believes, be a binding force in the Palestine of the future.

  • AP Photo

    I've Kept My Name

    A forthright rebuttal to “I Changed My Name,” an anonymous article published in the February 1948 Atlantic

  • Are Americans Polygamous?

    Is marriage a failed institution in America? Is it polygamy that we're looking for?

  • Sand Gets in Your Eyes

  • The Soldier Dead Come Home

  • Take Two Thousand Cucumbers

  • Dinner at the White House/Secret Session Speeches

  • Do American Men Like Women?

  • You Can't Eat Democracy

  • Success Story in Delhi