A. H. Raskin

  • The Big Squeeze on Labor Unions

    Automation is inexorably weakening the American labor movement. Despite the considerable economic and political clout the unions maintain, the balance of power is shifting—and management knows it. In no industry is the future more visible than in the newspaper business, where the once mighty printers’ union is being brought to its knees by computer technology.

  • Strikes by Public Employees

    Calvin Coolidge’s dictum “There is no right to strike against the public safety by anybody, anywhere, any time" still stands strong in the minds of many, but strikes against government are in fact happening with increasing frequency. The time is near, says the distinguished labor relations expert and editorial writer for the New York TIMES,when the ban on strikes by public employees will have to be reinforced or abandoned. Which way will society bend?

  • Making Strikes Obsolete

    Automation may soon make strikes obsolete, but in the meantime, our society must develop safeguards against the crippling consequences of labor walkouts, such as the recent strikes of transit workers, printers, steelworkers, and longshoremen. A. H. Raskin, for several years labor editor of the Yew York TIMES, examines the breakdown of traditional labor-management mediation techniques and suggests some creative alternatives.

  • Labor's Mutinous Mariners

    On shipboard as well as on the waterfront, the powerful unions of seamen and dockworkers manage to dominate the American merchant marine and control the commerce on our docks. The rivalry between Joseph Curran of the National Maritime Union and Paul Hall of the Seafarers International Union, which has often resulted in strikes, is here revealed by A. H. RASKIN of the New York TIMES.

  • The Power of James R. Hoffa

    A member of the editorial board of the New York TIMES,who has been consulted in many an arbitration, A. H. RASKIN is keenly aware of the problems which the threats of automation and unemployment have imposed on the unions and on management. This is the fourth in his series of articles on the nations biggest labor unions. His next will deal with the longshore and maritime unions.

  • Walter Reuther's Great Big Union

    The UAW is the most zestful of America’s big unions,” says A. H. RASKIN of the New York TIMES. “Most of its qualities of excitement have stemmed not from its strikes or even its Irailblazing exploits in collective bargaining, but from the caliber of its officialdom.”This article examines the dynamic thinking of Waller Reuther and his giant auto union.

  • John L. Lewis and the Mine Workers

    In this second article of a series on labor, A. H. RASKIN of the New York TIMESexamines the leadership of the United Mine Workers of America and the dangers now facing this union. In his next article Mr. Raskin, who has specialized in the labor-management field, will deal with Walter Reuther and the United Automobile Workers.

  • The Unions and Their Wealth

    A. H. RASKINhas been covering major labor-management developments for the New York TIMES for almost thirty years and is now a member of the paper’s editorial board. In World War II he received the Distinguished Service Medal for his contributions to the army’s labor relations program. His journalistic awards include the Sidney Hillman Memorial Award, the George Polk Award, and the Page One Award of the New York Newspaper Guild.

  • The Squeeze on the Unions

    A. H. has been covering major labormanagement developments for the New York TIMES for almost thirty years. In World War II he received the Distinguished Service Medal for his contributions to the Army’s labor relations program. His journalistic awards include the Sidney Hillman Memorial Award, the George Polk Award, and the Page One Award of the New York Newspaper Guild.