Presented by
<iframe width="640" height="360" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" src="http://www.theatlantic.com/video/iframe/378838/"></iframe> http://www.theatlantic.com/video/index/378838/the-death-of-film-after-hollywood-goes-digital-what-happens-to-movies/

Editors' Picks

The Death of Film: After Hollywood Goes Digital, What Happens to Movies?

Aug 27, 2014 | 136-part series
Video by Jason Gwynn & Jay Sheldon

In this documentary, directors Jason Gwynn and Jay Sheldon interview film projectionists during their last days on the job at a soon-to-be-defunct movie theater. As Hollywood studios move toward digital distribution, many theaters are forced to abandon their 35mm projectors—and pay up to $150,000 for new projection technology. This change, as the documentary explains, is heartbreaking for the people responsible for reels and reels of film.

If you enjoyed this short, you may also want to read Matthew Dessem's essay at The Dissolve about the challenges of preserving movies in a digital age. "Unless the unique challenges of digital preservation are met," he writes, "we run the risk of a future in which a film from 1894 printed on card stock has a better chance of surviving than a digital film from 2014."

Author: Chris Heller

Comments

About This Series

A curated showcase of short films selected by The Atlantic

Most Watched

More in this Series

Series

Latest